FOR A CONSULTATION CALL

086 041 9222

FARNANES, CO. CORK.

 

Find us on Facebook

Helpful Tips

 

Click on the tabs below to read more or click here to close

Deciding on which Hedge to choose:

Hedging can be planted for different reasons, ornamental value ,establishing boundries, privacy or screening, security or to stockproof .
All types of hedging will look well once it establishes itself and is clipped regularly.


Some, like Photinia Red Robin, Portugeese laurel or perhaps copper beech are more ornamental than others due to the colour of the leaf or stem at different times of the year.


Hedging is much cheaper than walls or fencing and is very often used to establish a boundry around a new house or to mark out the boundries of a site.


A boundry hedge is one of the first factors taken in when designing a landscape plan for your garden. It gives a clear picture of your gardens parameters and helps to identify what proportions you have to use between lawn, trees, shrub beds, patio, driveway and house.


Privacy is important to all of us, especially if you live in a built up area. Hedging is a massive factor when it comes to providing privacy solutions in your garden.


At The Hilly Hedge co we grow hedging plants up to 2.5m high and can offer you an instant screen for your garden. Griselinia, Privet, Conifers, Beech and even Bamboo are great for gardens in built up areas where space is tight.


Where security is an issue a thorny hedge will help to keep unwanted intruders at bay.


Berberis, Blackthorn and Hawthorn are thorny plants and make a great security hedge.


For those who need to stockproof a hedge or boundry, a Native Irish Hedgerow can be planted to acheive this.


A single type like Hawthorn or Blackthorn may be used, or perhaps you may choose to create a mixed Native Irish Hedgerow and use a mixture of different types of plants. For example Hawthorn, Blackthorn, Beech, Holly, Hazel and Fuchsia randomly mixed together.

Where you are planting the Hedge:

If you are planting a hedge in an exposed area make sure you plant a variety that will grow there. Use the descriptions in Hedging to help choosing a variety and size that will suit.


Generally speaking a smaller size plant with windbreak material erected correctly on the prevailing wind side of the hedge will improve the hedges chances of survival significantly.

 

If you are planting in a coastal area, choose a variety that suits coastal sites and protect it with windbreak material, erected correctly on the prevailing wind side if possible.

 

Where ground conditions are wet or heavy, efforts should be made to drain excess water away from the area you want to plant your hedge. A simple drain should do the trick or where this is not possible create a raised mound of good quality topsoil 40-50cm high and 70-80cm wide and plant your hedge on top. This will keep the roots of your hedging away from too much moisture.

Planting a Hedge:

All hedging plants that have been planted properly in good ground have a very high success rate.


The following is a helpfull guide to planting which will reduce the risk of transplant failure.

Soil:

Generally speaking the better the soil the healthier your plant will grow.
Enrich your soil by adding some well rotted organic material (at least two years old) like Horse manure, Farmyard manure, old grass clippings and leaves or some moss peat.


Make sure the area is well dug ,30cm x 30cm for small plants and twice the size of rootball or pot for larger sizes and free from weeds or sods.


Digging the soil well gives the roots room to grow and form a good root system that will give a healty looking plant.

Planting Bareroot Plants:

Using a spade dig a hole and place the bareroot plant in the ground, backfill the hole and firm up the ground with your foot whilst keeping the plant straight up with your hand.

 

It is very important not to plant the hedge too deep, (especially Beech) the hightest root on the plant should be no more than 20mm under the ground.

 

When you have finished planting it is important to give the plants a good watering.

 

Keep a close eye on moisture levels in the soil around the plants especially in the first spring and summer.

 

Lack of moisture is one of the main reasons a plant will fail in the first year.

 

Plant your hedge in a straight line. Use a line to help keep the hedge straight whilst planting.

 

Protect your hedge from wind if planting in exposed areas. Winbreak material and sundries can be purchased at The Hilly Hedge co.

 

Feeding your hedge by applying well rotted manure or a foliar feed will help encourage growth in the first year or two.

 

Some larger plants in exposed areas will need to be supported to keep them from going sideways in strong winds.

 

Please email Colin at info@thehillyhedge.ie if you have any questions regarding planting a Hedge or Trees.

Planting Rootballed Plants:

Dig a hole that is twice as big as the rootball and place the plant in the ground. LEAVE the hessian material ON the rootball.

 

This keeps the soil on the roots.

 

The top of the rootball should be level with the ground, no deeper. Firm up the soil well around the plant with your foot whilst keeping the plant straight up with your hand.

 

Firming up the soil will eliminate any air pockets and help keep the plant from going sideways in strong winds.

 

When you have finished planting it is important to give the plants a good watering. Keep a close eye on moisture levels in the soil around the plants especially in the first spring and summer.

 

Lack of moisture is one of the main reasons a plant will fail in the first year.

 

Plant your hedge in a straight line. Use a line to help keep the hedge straight whilst planting.

 

Protect your hedge from wind if planting in exposed areas. Winbreak material and sundries can be purchased at The Hilly Hedge co.

 

Feeding your hedge by applying well rotted manure or a foliar feed will help encourage growth in the first year or two.

 

Some larger plants in exposed areas will need to be supported to keep them from going sideways in strong winds.

 

Please email Colin at info@thehillyhedge.ie if you have any questions regarding planting a Hedge or Trees.

Planting Potted Plants:

Using a spade dig a hole twice the size of the pot. Remove the pot and gently tease out some of the roots from the rootball. Place the plant in the ground with the top of the rootball level with the ground and firm up the soil around the plant whilst keeping it straight up with your hand.


Firming up the soil will eliminate any air pockets and help keep the plant from going sideways in strong winds.

 

When you have finished planting it is important to give the plants a good watering. Keep a close eye on moisture levels in the soil around the plants especially in the first spring and summer.


Lack of moisture is one of the main reasons a plant will fail in the first year.

 

Plant your hedge in a straight line. Use a line to help keep the hedge straight whilst planting.

 

Protect your hedge from wind if planting in exposed areas. Winbreak material and sundries can be purchased at The Hilly Hedge co.

 

Feeding your hedge by applying well rotted manure or a foliar feed will help encourage growth in the first year or two.

 

Some larger plants in exposed areas will need to be supported to keep them from going sideways in strong winds.

 

Please email Colin at info@thehillyhedge.ie if you have any questions regarding planting a Hedge or Trees.

This Months

Special Offer

Including Delivery. Includes 10 strong potted Fuchsia hedge plants.

Keep up to date with us

Like us on facebook, follow us on twitter and join us on Linkedin.

FacebookTwitterLinkedin